Platelet E-News – June 10, 2002

This e-newsletter is a bi-weekly publication of The Platelet Disorder Support Association. The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only. For advice on your unique medical condition, please consult a health care professional.

Contents:

  • Register for our conference by June 18
  • New blood cleanser approved in Europe
  • New diabetes research holds promise for other autoimmune diseases
  • Cyclosporin A gets a new look

 

REGISTER FOR OUR CONFERENCE BY JUNE 18

If you plan to come to our conference, please register by June 18 so we can be sure we have enough food, chairs, and other things we need to make everyone comfortable.

Our conference will be held June 21-23, 2002 at the Marriott Mission Valley in San Diego, CA. For more conference information and to register, go to http://www.pdsa.org/conference.htm.

Conference sponsors include the DAISY Foundation, Genentech/IDEC, Nabi and others. We rely on our sponsors to help make our ITP conference possible. We appreciate their support.

NEW BLOOD CLEANSER APPROVED IN EUROPE

Cerus Corporation and Baxter International won European approval for a screening system that improves the safety of platelet transfusions. The system uses ultraviolet light to eliminate rare transmissions of HIV, hepatitis and other viral and bacterial infections not currently caught by other screening measures. The corporations hope to win US approval to use the system to screen blood platelets by early next year.

For more information see http://www.baxter.com/utilities/news/releases/2002/06-04-02intercept.html

Also reported in the Wall Street Journal, June 5, 2002.

NEW DIABETES RESEARCH HOLDS PROMISE FOR OTHER AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

Researchers at Columbia University and the University of California have completed a phase I/II clinical trail of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody that helped patients with type 1 diabetes reduce their need for insulin without debilitating side effects, according to recent articles in The New England Journal of Medicine and TIME magazine. Type 1 (juvenile-onset) diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the body destroys the insulin-secreting islet cells of the pancreas. The treatment works more selectively and requires a shorter treatment period than other immunosuppressive drugs. The good news for us is that this treatment may hold promise for other autoimmune diseases. The next disease on their research list is a kind of autoimmune arthritis associated with psoriasis.

For more information see:
  • http://www.nejm.org
  • http://www.ucsf.edu (press releases)

 

CYCLOSPORIN A GETS A NEW LOOK

About 83% of patients in a study at the University of Modena, Italy, responded positively to relatively low doses of cyclosporine A (CyA) according to a study published in the journal Blood and recounted in Hem/Onc Today. Giovanni Emilia, MD and his colleagues studied the effects of CyA on 12 patients with severe, refractory, chronic ITP. The study reported that clinical improvements were sustained in at least half the patients after they stopped taking the drug. Other patients continued on a low-dose treatment without major side effects.

See: Blood, 15 February 2002, Vol. 99, No. 4, pp. 1482-1485, Hem/Onc Today, Vol. 3 No. 6, p. 1.

For more information go to:
  • http://www.bloodjournal.org
  • http://www.hemonctoday.com
  • http://www.itppeople.com/immunosuppressants.htm

Our Maryland office will be closed June 20 - June 25 for our conference. Our next e-news will be sent July 1.


For information on advertising in our e-news letter contact us at pdsa@pdsa.org.

This e-newsletter is published by the Platelet Disorder Support Association, P.O. Box 61533, Potomac, MD, 20859, phone/fax: 1-87-Platelet or (301) 294-5967, web: http://www.pdsa.org/, e-mail: pdsa@pdsa.org

back to top

BBB Cleveland logo GuideStar Seal NORD Member Badge 2018THSNA logo